Ways to Pick The Most Effective Specialist For Residence Improvement



One of the most usual repairs that people do around their houses is on their windows. The most common reasons for home window repair are also broken glass and deteriorating putty, which is not only unattractive to the eyes but also produces openings that lets the air escape. Although anyone can always approach a professional to do repairs around the house, there are also certain repairs that can be done by house members and a broken window is one of these. If a family needs to replace the broken glass of a window, then they would just need a number of things to be able to do this.

Anyone can do their own home window repair. Among the things that they just need to get if their window has a broken glass pane are glazier's points, linseed, a glazing compound and of course, a new glass pane. These things can all be found in any hardware store in the neighborhood or just about anywhere. However, to be able to have more sash windows upvc choices on window panes, then they should head on to a glass shop. Once, all the materials needed are at hand, anyone can already get started on fixing their broken window.

The first step that needs to be done in home window repair is removing the old broken pane as well as the putty. This is made easier of linseed oil is applied to putty and would be left to stand for some thirty minutes. Heating the putty would also make its removal easier. Once the putty is already malleable, the glazier's points are the next to be removed. However, to get this out, the glass need to be broken completely. As soon as the glass has been taken away and that frame has been cleaned of all remnants of the old putty, boiled linseed oil should also be wiped onto the old wood. This keeps the wood from getting the oil that can be found in the glazing compound.

Laying glazing compound on the window sash on which the new glass pane will be set, is the next step to home window repair. As soon as the glass is set, glazier's points should be placed using a putty knife or a glazing tool at every four inch to keep the glass in its place. The points should be inserted straight and firmly into the wood, against the glass. To seal the pane in, more glazing compound should be applied. It should be made sure that half of the glazing is set on the glass while the other half should be in the frame. After a few days, these new window can already be painted. However, you should also paint the edge of the glass right before the frame to seal in the glazing.

https://www.google.com/maps/embed?pb=!1m18!1m12!1m3!1d2485.1630527451966!2d-0.3488116846369748!3d51.47352132100127!2m3!1f0!2f0!3f0!3m2!1i1024!2i768!4f13.1!3m3!1m2!1s0x48760d1de198457f%3A0x37229dc3caebb30d!2sMortice+%26+Green+Showroom!5e0!3m2!1sen!2suk!4v1511455817296

Numerous individuals believe that residence enhancement is impossible to do by themselves. Every year, month, week, and day people attempt to make enhancements to their houses, only to fail badly.

If you have determined to start servicing improving your house, yet you want to do this alone, you need to make sure to start with an very easy job. Lots of people jump straight into something like adding on one more area, and then they rapidly find themselves bewildered and also confused regarding just what they are doing.

When doing home improvements in the shower room, make sure you use the appropriate caulking for the job at hand. If you do not use water evidence caulking and just make use of water immune caulking, you are movinged towards catastrophe. Water will seep in as well as rot the material causing an costly repair work.

If you have a home improvement project that you can refrain alone and you need to work with someone in order to help, make certain the person you utilize has appropriate insurance policy coverage. You certainly do not wish to be responsible for any type of injuries or clinical problems which occur to somebody working on your home, because the cost of medical and also worker's compensation bills can be big.

If you intend to make your home shine then want to the visual allure. Impacts are crucial with individuals, and they are simply as important to your home. Consider painting if your shade is fading or is dated, and choose colors as well as other details that match the era of your house.

If you can not find simply the best color of grout to complete that tiling task, personalized color some yourself! Acrylic craft paint, available at most discount rate and pastime stores, is an simple as well as thrifty way to get the perfect grout color. Explore small amounts of dry cement, making use of the double glazing sash windows london paint instead of a few of the water needed to mix it, spread onto a paper plate to allow dry and you will promptly discover the best shade of cement for your project.

Include matching cabinets in your living space or build a window seat where your family members could sit and also review. Simple jobs like these could make every room in your home functional as well as useful to your household.

Try maintaining your home protected. Insulating your wall surfaces is a reasonably low cost house improvement that will certainly aid you save cash in the future, along with protecting the setting. Keeping your residence insulated not just maintains it warm in winter, but it additionally maintains it great in the summer.

As specified prior to in the intro, many individuals believe residence enhancement is difficult. Individuals try constantly to boost their residences, yet often fail. Despite these failures, home improvement is not as difficult as the majority of people think. All you need to do is keep in mind the house renovation pointers in this short article making it easier.

Several individuals believe sash windows repair that residence enhancement is difficult to do by themselves. Every year, month, week, and day individuals attempt to make enhancements to their residences, just to fall short badly. When doing residence improvements in the shower room, make sure you utilize the proper caulking for the task at hand. As stated before in the introduction, numerous individuals assume home renovation is impossible. Also with these failings, home renovation is not as tough as most individuals think.

How you can Choose The Most Effective Contractor For House Renovation



One of the most usual repairs that people do around their houses is on their windows. The most common reasons for home window repair are also broken glass and deteriorating putty, which is not only unattractive to the eyes but also produces openings that lets the air escape. Although anyone can always approach a professional to do repairs around the house, there are also certain repairs that can be done by house members and a broken window is one of these. If a family needs to replace the broken glass of a window, then they would just need a number of things to be able to do this.

Anyone can do their own home window repair. Among the things that they just need to get if their window has a broken glass pane are glazier's points, linseed, a glazing compound and of course, a new glass pane. These things can all be found in any hardware store in the neighborhood or just about anywhere. However, to wood sash windows be able to have more choices on window panes, then they should head on to a glass shop. Once, all the materials needed are at hand, anyone can already get started on fixing their broken window.

The first step that needs to be done in home window repair is removing the old broken pane as well as the putty. This is made easier of linseed oil is applied to putty and would be left to stand for some thirty minutes. Heating the putty would also make its removal easier. Once the putty is already malleable, the glazier's points are the next to be removed. However, to get this out, the glass need to be broken completely. london sash window repair As sash window repair london soon as the glass has been taken away and that frame has been cleaned of all remnants of the old putty, boiled linseed oil should also be wiped onto the old wood. This keeps the wood from getting the oil that can be found in the glazing compound.

Laying glazing compound on the window sash on which the new glass pane will be set, is the next step to home window repair. As soon as the glass is set, glazier's points should be placed using a putty knife or a glazing tool at every four inch to keep the glass in its place. The points should be inserted straight and firmly into the wood, against the glass. To seal the pane in, more glazing compound should be applied. It should be made sure that half of the glazing is set on the glass while the other half should be in the frame. After a few days, these new window can already be painted. However, you should also paint the edge of the glass right before the frame to seal in the glazing.

https://www.google.com/maps/embed?pb=!1m18!1m12!1m3!1d2485.1630527451966!2d-0.3488116846369748!3d51.47352132100127!2m3!1f0!2f0!3f0!3m2!1i1024!2i768!4f13.1!3m3!1m2!1s0x48760d1de198457f%3A0x37229dc3caebb30d!2sMortice+%26+Green+Showroom!5e0!3m2!1sen!2suk!4v1511455817296

Many individuals think that home renovation is impossible to do by themselves. Every year, month, week, and day people try to make enhancements to their residences, only to fall short miserably.

If you have actually chosen to begin servicing improving your residence, but you want to do this alone, you ought to make certain to start with an easy job. Many people leap right into something like additionaling an additional room, and afterwards they promptly find themselves overwhelmed and confused about just what they are doing.

When doing house improvements in the bathroom, make sure you make use of the appropriate caulking for the task at hand. If you do not utilize water evidence caulking and also only utilize water immune caulking, you are gone to calamity. Water will certainly leak in as well as rot the material bring about an pricey repair service.

If you have a residence improvement job that you could not do alone as well as you need to hire a person to assist, ensure the person you employ has proper insurance protection. You most definitely do not wish to be responsible for any kind of injuries or clinical troubles which occur to someone working on your home, since the cost of clinical and also worker's settlement bills can be big.

If you wish to make your house sparkle then planning to the visual charm. Perceptions are essential with people, as well as they are simply as essential to your home. Consider repainting if your color is fading or is dated, and choose colors and other details that suit the era of your house.

If you cannot locate just the ideal shade of grout to end up that tiling task, personalized shade some on your own! Acrylic craft paint, available at most discount as well as hobby stores, is an very easy and thrifty means to get the excellent grout shade. Try out percentages of dry grout, utilizing the paint instead of several of the water should mix it, spread onto a paper plate to allow completely dry and also you will swiftly discover the ideal shade of cement for your project.

Include matching cabinets in your living room or build a window seat where your household could sit as well as check out. Straightforward jobs like these could make every room in your home functional and also beneficial to your family members.

Attempt maintaining your residence protected. Insulating your walls is a reasonably low cost home enhancement that will certainly assist you conserve cash over time, together with securing the setting. Maintaining your residence shielded not just keeps it cozy in winter season, however it additionally keeps it cool in the summer.

As stated before in the intro, many individuals assume residence renovation is difficult. Individuals try at all times to enhance their residences, yet usually stop working. Despite these failures, home enhancement is not as hard as most people think. All you have to do is bear in mind the house improvement tips in this article making it simpler.

Several individuals assume that residence enhancement is impossible to do by themselves. Every year, month, week, and day individuals attempt to make renovations to their houses, just to fall short badly. When doing residence renovations in the washroom, make certain you make use of the appropriate caulking for the task at hand. As mentioned before in the introduction, lots of people assume home renovation is difficult. Also with these failings, residence renovation is not as difficult as most individuals assume.

The best ways to Pick The Most Effective Service Provider For Home Improvement



One of the most usual repairs that people do around their houses is on their windows. The most common reasons for home window repair are also broken glass and deteriorating putty, which is not only unattractive to the eyes but secondary glazing sash windows also produces openings that lets the air escape. Although anyone can always approach a professional to do repairs around the house, there are also certain repairs that can be done by house members and a broken window is one of these. If a family needs to replace the broken glass of a window, then they would just need a number of things to be able to do this.

Anyone can do their own home window repair. Among the things that they just need to get if their window has a broken glass pane are glazier's points, linseed, a glazing compound and of course, a new glass pane. These things can all be found in any hardware store in the neighborhood or just about anywhere. However, to be able to have more choices on window panes, then they should head on to a glass shop. Once, all the materials needed are at hand, anyone can already get started on fixing their broken window.

The first step that needs to be done in home window repair is removing the old broken pane as well as the putty. This is made easier of linseed oil is applied to putty and would be left to stand for some thirty minutes. Heating the putty would also make its removal easier. Once the putty is already malleable, the glazier's points are the next to be removed. However, to get this out, the glass need to be broken completely. As soon as the glass has been taken away and that frame has been cleaned of all remnants of the old putty, boiled linseed oil should also be wiped onto the old wood. This keeps the wood from getting the oil that can be found in the glazing compound.

Laying glazing compound on the window sash on which the new glass pane will be set, is the next step to home window repair. As soon as the glass is set, glazier's points should be placed using a putty knife or a glazing tool at every four inch to keep the glass in its place. The points should be inserted straight and firmly into the wood, against the glass. To seal the pane in, more glazing compound should be applied. It should be made sure that half of the glazing is set on the glass while the other half should be in the frame. After a few days, these new window can already be painted. However, you should also paint the edge of the glass right before the frame to seal in the glazing.

https://www.google.com/maps/embed?pb=!1m18!1m12!1m3!1d2485.1630527451966!2d-0.3488116846369748!3d51.47352132100127!2m3!1f0!2f0!3f0!3m2!1i1024!2i768!4f13.1!3m3!1m2!1s0x48760d1de198457f%3A0x37229dc3caebb30d!2sMortice+%26+Green+Showroom!5e0!3m2!1sen!2suk!4v1511455817296

Lots of individuals think that residence improvement is impossible to do by themselves. Every year, month, week, and day individuals attempt to make renovations to their residences, only to stop working badly.

If you have made a decision to start working on enhancing your residence, yet you want to do this alone, you ought to make certain to start with an simple task. Lots of people jump straight into something like adding one more room, then they quickly find themselves bewildered and perplexed about just what they are doing.

When doing residence improvements in the restroom, make certain you utilize the proper caulking for the work handy. If you do not utilize water proof caulking as well as only use water immune caulking, you are gone to calamity. Water will certainly seep in as well as rot the product resulting in an costly repair service.

If you have a house improvement task that you can not do alone and also you must hire somebody in order to help, see to it the person you use has appropriate insurance policy coverage. You definitely do not wish to be liable for any kind of injuries or clinical issues which strike somebody working on your home or business, considering that the expense of clinical and workman's settlement expenses can be big.

If you wish to make your residence luster then planning to the visual appeal. Impressions are essential with individuals, as well as they are just as essential to your house. Consider painting if your shade is fading or is dated, and also select colors and other details that fit into the era of your residence.

If you can't locate simply the appropriate color of cement to end up that tiling job, personalized color some yourself! Acrylic craft paint, available at most discount rate and pastime stores, is an very easy as well as thrifty way to obtain the excellent cement color. Trying out small amounts of dry cement, using the paint instead of some of the water had to blend it, spread out into a paper plate to let completely dry and you will quickly find the ideal color of cement for your task.

Include how to repair sash windows matching cabinets in your living room or construct a home window seat where your household can sit as well as review. Simple tasks like these can make every room in your house useful and useful to your family.

Try keeping your residence shielded. Protecting your wall surfaces is a relatively low cost house improvement that will certainly assist you conserve money over time, along with protecting the environment. Keeping your home shielded not just keeps it warm in winter months, however it likewise keeps it cool in the summer season.

As mentioned before in the introduction, many individuals think house improvement is impossible. People attempt all the time to improve their houses, however often fall short. Even with these failings, house improvement is not as hard as most people believe. All you need to do is remember the house improvement suggestions in this write-up to make it easier.

Many people assume that residence improvement is difficult to do by themselves. Every year, month, week, and also day people try to make renovations to their residences, only to fall short badly. When doing home enhancements in the bathroom, make sure you make use of the correct caulking for the timber sliding sash windows job at hand. As specified before in the intro, numerous individuals think home renovation is difficult. Even with these failures, home renovation is not as hard as a lot of people think.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to georgian sash window have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your glass window repair window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure double window lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind sash windows north london of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck replacement sash windows double glazed on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. the window doctor New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer sash window mouldings size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble secondary glazing for sash windows of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new victorian sash windows piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process sash window fittings is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window locks for sash windows window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window the window man essex has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that london sash window repair is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are sash window draught excluder as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms sash window draught that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) upvc sash windows and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded sash window repairs north london stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out sliding sash or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed plastic sash windows with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and sash windows yorkshire 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he stained glass window repair said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your sash upvc old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if wooden sash windows you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that sash uk the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I wooden sash windows london have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We glass replacement london were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family windows in london gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how sash window repairs brighton the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also sash window plans buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready double glazed windows london to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated timber windows surrey brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," sash glass he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not how to replace putty on wooden windows have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square sash window beading feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely sash window hardware neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may sash window draught excluder want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the sash windows north london Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's upvc sliding sash windows dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take repair glass window the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a sash window restoration maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and sash windows london ltd civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. repairing wooden windows Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that how to make sash windows the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel timber windows essex fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the replace window putty park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where putty a window construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and mock sash windows a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to sash cord repair the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type glass repair london of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the sash window specialists full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this wooden sash environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free original sash in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become window frame brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive sash window repair shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is sash window repair london now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the a and p roofing architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he replacement windows uk chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a repair sash window respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a double glazed windows task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to the window specialist its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London sash london so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra replacement sash windows cost space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out sash window insulation of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of sash window repair brighton spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design window glass repairs junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to replacement sash windows double glazed mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling sash windows south london window in the future living room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea glass and window that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that specialist windows are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window

Repairing Your Stained Glass Window Sash Window Repairs North London

So, when I heard that the developer Ian Schrager of trendy boutique hotel fame had chosen the English architect John Pawson, a maestro of minimalist style, to transform the 18-story building at 50 Gramercy Park North into a 23-residence condominium, I could not wait to see how the worlds of cutting-edge design and Old World charm could be joined.

I have also always loved the idea of living on Gramercy Park, an enclave reminiscent of the small-scaled and civilized squares I craved from my student days in London so many years ago. Not surprisingly, I am not alone, and Mr. Schrager knows that. His marketing copy ("A precious and rare opportunity with additional services and amenities created exclusively for a family") links bucolic scenes of the park with digital images of the proposed interiors in a deliciously illustrated brochure (a little girl in a flowered dress, small boys in berets, sun-dappled trees) that is as seductive as an ice cream cone on a hot summer day.

Having made an appointment for a visit on a cold, clear morning, I meet Mr. Schrager in front of the building, where construction is in full swing. We don hard hats and ride an exterior elevator up to what will be Apartment 5B, where one can look out the floor-to-ceiling window in the future living sash window london room at a mouth-watering view of the park. The clear expanse of glass and a bird's-eye view of the park are mesmerizing even with the naked trees and empty benches.

Mr. Schrager explains that we are standing in what was once part of the gap between the 181-room Gramercy Park Hotel (also Mr. Schrager's and being totally redesigned by the artist Julian Schnabel in what the developer called "a quirky bohemian style and Renaissance colors") and its original annex. The new glass "minitower," which Mr. Pawson calls "the new bit," is now connected to that annex, which has had its windows enlarged to unify it with the new building.

In a telephone interview from London, Mr. Pawson said that Mr. Schrager wanted 12-foot ceilings. "But as that was not possible to have on every floor, we figured out how to add a high-ceilinged extra space to apartments on every other floor," he said. "I see it as a kind of compression and release."

I'm impressed with the architect's clever way of adding glass boxes to the prewar building. It's a respectful solution that does not fight with the Old World feeling of the area, sort of like a facelift that works.

There are four apartments still available, and all have views of the park: 5A (2,149 square feet for $6.250 million); 9B (2,873 square feet for $9.35 million); 7A (3,477 square feet for $8.975 million), and 14A (2,988 square feet for $10.250 million) as well as a 4,235-square-foot penthouse with a 1,306-square-foot terrace that is $16 million. (Monthly maintenance ranges from $5,472 to an astonishing $17,721.)

The sheer size of most of the apartments is what seems to particularly excite Mr. Schrager. One master bedroom measures 945 square feet.

"Most developers don't like to build big apartments," Mr. Schrager said. "They are often harder to sell than smaller, more flexible units where the market is deeper."

Mr. Schrager said the apartments come with the type of services that only the very privileged enjoy. Here, it is called executive lifestyle management and includes room service, babysitting, painting and repair services, and like the hotel around the corner, turn-down service.

Mr. Schrager suggests we visit the full-size mock-ups of a kitchen and bathroom. On the way, I try to reconcile the concept of these large family apartments with Mr. Pawson's particular brand of minimalism -- the nearly spiritual kind where a box of Kleenex on the bathroom counter, a dirty frying pan in the sink, a plastic toy truck on the rug, or a pile of old magazines can be major intrusions. Never mind that the English architect (known in New York for the serenely neat Calvin Klein store) is a father himself (his sons Caius and Benedict are 20 and 16, his stepdaughter, Phoebe, is 27) and that he has had plenty of experience raising children in his oft-photographed and sublimely uncluttered home.

"Kids feel free in these kinds of spaces," Mr. Pawson said. "Having a clear run seems nicer for them. We were the most popular parents on the block."

As our children are of similar ages, and as a fan of Mr. Pawson's plain open spaces, I've always toyed with the idea that my family could not only live in such uncluttered splendor but that 50 Gramercy Park North might very well be the fulfillment of this design junkie's dream. I also buy into the current design ethos: the pale-hued bathroom as a sanctuary, the sleek kitchen, wide open to the living space, as a family gathering spot.

Running my finger across translucent glass tile and smooth travertine, or beautifully finished cherrywood materials that are as soothing and tactile as they are sophisticated, I believe that if I lived there I would be able to breathe more deeply and have loftier thoughts, unimpeded by piles of paper or a jumble of mismatched pillows. I am drawn not only to the quality of the materials he chose but to the feeling of lightness and calm that his spaces exude.

Even in the model apartment, the clean lines of the fireplace and the openness of the kitchen are calming. Somehow, Mr. Pawson's minimalism does not feel limiting, but strangely liberating and soothing. Maybe it's the soft palette, the view over the park, the generously sized rooms that make the spaces feel clean and yes, comfortable -- even for a pack rat.

I'm simply not worried here about where to put all our stuff. I say a silent prayer: Yes, if I could afford to live here, I promise I would get rid of everything -- and I mean everything -- that would disrupt the serenity of this environment.

Mr. Pawson's words come to mind. "I never said people should live without stuff, although I personally don't like to have more than I need around," he said.

I'm enraptured, even though I can't help feeling that I could never live up to this aesthetic. And I'm just not sure I want my home to be better than I am.

If you have some experience in stained glass handi-crafts repairing your old or damaged stained glass window is a project you may consider doing yourself. This article assumes you have at least some experience in this craft. If your window is very valuable, if you do not have any experience in stained glass window making or if you lack confidence in your abilities this is a task you may want to leave to the professionals. Otherwise, the process is very much like creating a new stained glass window and even a little easier in the sense that you do not have to do much, if any, glass cutting.

Problem #1: The leaded stained glass window cames are around seventy years old (or older) and have become brittle causing bulging or breaking.

This usually begins to happen in a stained glass window over seventy years old. Lead does not rot or rust, but it does lose its elasticity and become brittle over time. If left unattended it may cause the stained glass pieces to fall out or break as well.

The Solution:

Re-leading the window. This is time consuming, but very worthwhile to restore your stained glass window to its original beauty and integrity. The following steps must be taken:

1. Take a photograph of the window and measure lead cames to help with reconstructing it later.

2. Take the panel out of the window frame and remove panel framing.

3. Next, you will need to take the entire panel apart using the soldering iron to loosen solder and gently pry the old cames from the glass pieces.

4. Dispose of old lead in an environmentally friendly way, you should probably take it to a metal recycling facility.

5. Next each piece of glass should be thoroughly cleaned and dried. Lay the pieces in place so as not to become confused later.

6. Reassemble panel using with new lead cames in the same width as the original.

7. Broken stained glass pieces should be traced and matched as closely as possible to a new piece of glass cut with the pattern you create. Another option if you have all the broken pieces and either cannot match the stained glass closely enough or do not want to put new pieces draught sealing sash windows in, is to use thin lead cames to hold the broken pieces together. This option will likely make it obvious that the window has been repaired, so use with care.

8. New cement should be applied to both sides

9. New reinforcement bars should now be attached.

10. The stained glass panel is now ready to be re-framed and re-hung.

This process should be done when the window is nearing seventy years old. Following the steps above should result in a complete restoration of your stained glass window and it should be as structurally sound as a brand new one.

Problem #2: One stained glass panel in a window less than 70-years-old is broken.

The Solution:

This will depend on the location of the broken piece. If it is near the outer edge, you may be able to get away with carefully breaking the damaged piece out of the frame and using the soldering iron to loosen the lead cames and then re-soldering the new piece in place as in #7 above. If the broken piece is in a difficult location or if there are several broken pieces, you may want to re-lead the entire window following the above instructions. If there is a small crack, you might consider using a glass repair kit from the automotive shop. These are used to fix small chips and cracks in windshields and if the damage is slight, may be a suitable way to repair the crack and prevent further damage.

There are a number restoring old wood windows of other small repairs that you can do yourself such as re-painting areas that have flaked off, but these will need to be removed and re-kilned and you may want to consult with a professional for help with that. Restoring your stained glass window may be a painstaking process, but it is worth it to preserve its original beauty and make it last for future generations.
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